La vie est belle !

A to Z 2016 — La Voix

Bonjour mes chers lecteurs ! Bienvenue sur le site “Forty, C’est Fantastique.” Qu’est-ce que c’est ? De quoi s’agit-il ? Alors, c’est mon voyage vers la langue française. Un voyage sans fin. Je l’ai commencé il y a trois ans et demi. De temps en temps, il y a des gens qui me demandent : “Comment as-tu appris la langue française ?” Je leur réponds : “Je n’ai pas appris la langue française. Je suis toujours en train de l’apprendre”

Parlez Français !

Parlez Français !

 


La Partie en anglais

Now, there are definite rules to French pronunciation. It’s not too hard to understand, but you absolutely have to go over and over them and practice. The best way to do this is to read out loud. That’s it!  In order to pronounce the words well, it’s best if you have a real French person to imitate when you do this. That’s why things like that book with mp3 that I pointed you to earlier are good, as are the recordings by Camille Chevalier-Karfis at French Today.   There are also a ton of things on YouTube, like recordings of famous French poems. Check this one out, because apparently every French kid has to memorize this. I am obviously not a French kid, but I memorized it too : Le Corbeau et le Renard –  Jean de la Fontaine. 

 

OK, if you went to that page on the French Today website, you will now know that it is not just pronouncing the words. There is a “French Rhythm” too. If you watched the videos I made during this “A to Z” you may have noticed that I myself do not really have this “French Rhythm” when I speak. It’s yet another thing that marks me as “une étrangère” when I speak. It’s a work in progress.  I try to improve this by reading out loud!  Poems, articles, anything I can find that has a transcription and a recording to copy. Check out this blog, for a place to find great recordings of real French people speaking normally, but with transcriptions provided by the lovely Anne : Je dis, tu dis, il dit, nous disons…  I love her site and truly, I need to visit more often !

 

Having a transcription really really helps to cement those connections between spelling and pronunciation. And oh how the French love their silent letters, and their liaisons and their elisions.  Reading aloud is important for all this, and it’s free!

 

Before leaving the letter “V” I have one other thing to say. I have to admit to you that I am completely addicted to the TV show “The Voice – France.” I can’t watch in in the US on the TF1 site, but fortunately for me there is someone who is posting the show on YouTube, it’s just a couple weeks behind. I don’t mind waiting, honestly! I prefer it to the US version of “The Voice” because there is such a great variety of music, everything from French classics to Jazz standards to Miley Cyrus. It’s much more variety than the US version. Plus, I love the four artists who are the judges and it is great for listening in French.  Don’t start watching it if you don’t want to get addicted!

 


The Part in French

À propos de la prononciation française, il y a des règles. Elles sont assez faciles à comprendre mais il faut les réviser. La meilleure façon d’arriver à une bonne compréhension de ces règles est de lire “à haute voix.” Afin d’avoir une bonne prononciation, il est préférable d’utiliser un enregistrement d’un vrai français(e) et d’imiter cela. Mais ce n’est pas seulement la prononciation des mots. En fait, il s’agit d’un rythme des phrases qui est distinctement “français.” Si vous avez regardé mes deux vidéos pendant ce “défi de A à Z”, vous avez peut-être remarqué que je n’ai pas ce “rythme français” quand je parle. Ce n’est pas vraiment une question de compréhension (j’espère!) mais cela est une chose qui me marque comme “étrangère.” Je m’efforce d’améliorer mon sens du rythme en lisant à haute voix. Des poèmes, des articles, toutes sortes de choses pour lesquelles il y a des transcriptions et des enregistrements.

Lire à haute voix, c’est important pour accorder les sons et l’orthographe, je crois. De plus, c’est facile et gratuit 🙂

Avant que je ne laisse la lettre “V”, il reste encore une chose à vous dire. Je dois vous avouer que je suis complètement accro à l’émission de TF1 “The Voice – France”. Aux Etats-Unis il n’est pas possible de la regarder sur le site de TF1 mais ils mettent des vidéos sur YouTube ! Donc je peux la suivre comme ça. Les vidéos sur YouTube ont une ou deux semaines de retard mais çela ne me dérange pas. J’adore cette émission parce qu’il y a beaucoup de variété dans la musique, les participants chantent bien et les juges sont parmi mes chanteurs favoris .


Le mot du jour from Larousse.fr : (you can click on the word to go to their site, which includes a pronunciation of the word)

Verdure : 

  • Littéraire. Couleur verte de la végétation : La verdure des prés.
  • Végétation d’un lieu (arbres, plantes, herbes, feuillage) : Un tapis de verdure.
  • Familier. Légumes verts, salades qu’on mange crus : Qui veut encore de la verdure ?

verdure. Larousse.fr Retrieved March 15, 2016, from http://www.larousse.fr/dictionnaires/francais/verdure/81504?q=verdure#80543

In English: Green color of vegetation; the vegetation in a place; (fam.) green salad or other greens eaten raw (“rabbit food”)

Ex: “La verdure du champ derrière ta maison est magnifique.”

“The green plants in the field behind your house are magnificent.”

V

 

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11 Responses to “A to Z 2016 — La Voix”

  1. Deb

    This is very informative. I will give The voice-France a chance. May not understand everything that will be said…but I do love a good singing show.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    • jetgirlcos

      Quite aside from the French practice part, I really do prefer the variety of music on the French version to the American one, where usually (at least the last time I watched it) everyone just wants to be Beyonce. Not that there’s anything wrong with that…she has an awesome voice, but I do like hearing songs that are new to me 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  2. Arlee Bird

    My wife always seems impressed by my pronunciation of French names and phrases. People who speak French probably are not.

    Your advice takes me back to my college days when I was taking French. That was in the early 70’s. We were supposed to go to the language lab where we’d listen to taped recordings and then repeat them so our voices would be recorded so we could listen back to them. I rarely went because I never seemed to have enough time. I learned to read French okay, but not speak it well. Same way with Spanish. Though my wife is also impressed about how well I speak Spanish and Spanish is her first language so she should know. Or maybe she’s just trying to make me feel good.

    Be sure to visit my post today where I’m featuring your Manhattan story.

    Arlee Bird
    A to Z Challenge Co-host
    Tossing It Out

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    • jetgirlcos

      I imagine that you must have a talent for languages, Monsieur Bird ! Comme un oiseau, n’est-ce pas ? Thanks so much for the re-post on your site! I am really honored!

      Like

      Reply
  3. evelyneholingue

    Tellement d’accord sur ce que vous dites sur le manque de cadence lorsque l’on parle une langue qui n’est pas sa langue natale. La musique je l’appelle. Je ne l’ai pas non plus en anglais mais c’est ainsi. Vous parlez vraiment bien sur les extraits que vous avez mis sur votre blog il y a quelque temps. Bravo.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    • jetgirlcos

      C’est tout à fait ça, “la musique”… particulièrement en français, une langue qui ressemble à une chanson même quand on lis une liste de courses ! Bonne raison de regarder “La Voix” ! Merci pour le compliment. Ça me rend heureuse 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
    • jetgirlcos

      Oh, et j’ai oublie de vous dire…j’ai vu votre interview sur “Page-burners” et c’est fantastique ! Vous avez l’air très “cozy” dans votre fauteuil, exactement comme j’imagine un auteur…

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  4. Celine Jeanjean

    Hello Kelli! I’m finally catching up on your A to Z – sorry it’s taken me so long. This is a great post to start with, totally took me back to my childhood with the La Fontaine poems, I had to memorise Le Corbeau et le Renard. I clicked on the link to check if I still knew the words, I’d forgotten the middle but I knew the start perfectly. The one I still know by heart is La Cigale et La Fourmi. 😉

    If you like French music by the way, you might like Notre Dame de Paris, the soundtrack from the musical. It’s wonderful and it’s partly spoken (a bit like an opera) and partly sung. It’s on Spotify. Now I’m off to find one of those videos where you speak French, I’m curious!!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    • jetgirlcos

      Thanks Celine! And now that I’ve finished A to Z I have rewarded myself with “The Black Orchid” which I will post my review of soon, so that my readers will know how much fun it is! (readers: “The Black Orchid” is Celine’s new novel! Highly recommended, on Amazon now!)

      Like

      Reply

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